Sanding FAQ | QuickWood.com
0 item items
in cart
1-866-888-5858
Facebook Twitter YouTube

Sanding FAQ

Explanation of certain Industrial Specific woods used on this website:

Abrasives Strips: An abrasive strip is used in front of the brush to sand the part. The brush is used as a backing device to make the abrasive more firm as it flexes to the parts profile.

Brush Abrasives: An abrasive strip that is backed up by a brush strip, these two strips can be one part or two parts depending on the manufacture. QuickWood is the only company where the abrasives strip can be removed and replaced without changing the brush.

Brush Sanding: Brush sanding is the way we sand with brushes backing up abrasives.

Denibbing: When you remove nibs or fibers from the surface of the wood, this could be in the raw wood before stain and sealer or in the sanding process in the sealer. When the fibers comes up in the wood a denibbing process is what the sanding of the fibers are called.

Deburring: Used for both metal and wood parts after the part has been machined. Small burrs are left of the edges or in the surface. The process to remove these burrs is called deburring.

Finishing Sanding: Final sanding on the raw wood before stain and sealer is applied; this process removes fibers in the surface to reduce sealer consumption and to reduce the amount of fiber raising in the sealer. The white wood sanding process will also break sharp edges for better stain and sealer penetration on the edges. This process is also called white wood sanding.

Moldings: US spelling of parts like trip, crown and so on.

Mouldings UK Spelling

Sealer Sanding: Sanding on the first or second sealer coat for wood parts, to remove the fibers in the surface. This process can also be called denibbing.

White Wood Sanding: Final sanding on the raw wood before stain and sealer is applied; this process will remove fibers in the surface to reduce sealer consumption and to reduce the amount of fiber raising in the sealer. The white wood sanding process will also break sharp edges for better stain and sealer penetration on the edges. This process is also called finishing sanding or final sanding.